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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have stuck fronts so its time to replace it...
My choices are Centric, Nastra, Raybestos, and A-1 Cardone.
All reman'd.

Also can probably get Napa Eclipse.

Any recomendations?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
id get the centrics.

eeuro might have the best price.
might be my only option if i dont find anything locally
A-1 Cardone are done in Philadelphia, they are usually good quality components.
thanks that means the napa ones will be good as well cuz cardone makes them. I like that answer :D Will go to napa tomorrow!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
On a related note, how much brake fluid do our cars take? Im gonna do a flush while im at it.
 

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PBR calipers with DBA slotted and crossdrilled rotors and Hawk ceramic pads, ATE Superblue fluid... ;-)
 

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On a related note, how much brake fluid do our cars take? Im gonna do a flush while im at it.
Are you going to change the clutch fluid too, or is it not necessary? I'll be tackling this in spring with my big brake upgrade, and would REALLY not like to mess with the clutch-bleeding mess again lol.
 

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I bled sleepy's brakes pretty much by myself in about 10 mins or so, including the time to find some teflon tape. If the fluid is more than a few years old, its going be nasty molasses instead of a nice light honey color.

Do you really want all that moisture attacking the caliper pistons and lines? And those new brakes are going to be useless when the brake fluid boils because its water-logged.;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Are you going to change the clutch fluid too, or is it not necessary? I'll be tackling this in spring with my big brake upgrade, and would REALLY not like to mess with the clutch-bleeding mess again lol.
Mines an auto so no clutch to worry about :)

I bled sleepy's brakes pretty much by myself in about 10 mins or so, including the time to find some teflon tape. If the fluid is more than a few years old, its going be nasty molasses instead of a nice light honey color.

Do you really want all that moisture attacking the caliper pistons and lines? And those new brakes are going to be useless when the brake fluid boils because its water-logged.;)
Well that's what I'm asking, how much fluid do I need to buy to fully flush out the old fluid and then have enough to fill up the system.
 

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I bled sleepy's brakes pretty much by myself in about 10 mins or so, including the time to find some teflon tape. If the fluid is more than a few years old, its going be nasty molasses instead of a nice light honey color.

Do you really want all that moisture attacking the caliper pistons and lines? And those new brakes are going to be useless when the brake fluid boils because its water-logged.;)
Of course I'm gonna change the brake fluid for the brakes! I'm wondering about the clutch though, seeing as it is a common reservoir for brakes and clutch.
 

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Seems part of my message didn't make it.
Large bottle (32 oz) was more than enough, had around 1/4 the bottle left.

Edit: You can bleed the clutch line, but you can't bleed the slave cylinder in-car. Just have to bleed the brakes, and then bleed the clutch. Use/get a vacuum bleeder(with a hand vacuum bleeder and catch can) and things will go by nice and easy. The WIS has the clutch done with a similar system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks, now I know what equipment I need, I'll tackle this wednesday!
 

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I usually buy two 32oz bottles just in case it takes a little extra - nothing more annoying than having to stop bleeding to run to the auto parts store.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Awesome I will do that then.

Question, since I am removing the calipers, can I just bleed it from the brake line, and then install the new caliper, and then bleed through the bleeder valve on the caliper just to get air out of the system? or is that a bad idea?
 

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You don't have to bleed it before you install the new caliper. Sometimes a new caliper may require a 2nd bleed after the first drive around to get all the air out. Tap the caliper with a rubber mallet if you have one, and you might only have to bleed it once. The reason is that sometimes air bubbles will stick to the inside of the new caliper, and a light tap will bring them to the top (your bleed valve)

Have enough chemicals on hand always. Have extra brake clean and brake fluid on hand before you start. Also remember to grease the sliders and apply a very small amount of brake caliper grease on the metal on metal contact points only. - likely since you have rebuilt calipers you will find this has already been done.
 
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