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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First of all i know this is a saab forum and not a Bmw one but i figured this was a general car question. Also i trust you guys more than do the guys on the BMW forums.

I know many of you have winterized your viggens, spgs etc. and i was wondering what you did exactly? The 328 is about 2k miles away from a fresh oil change and a major tune up and i think it would be a waste to do the tune up now and just have it sit for a couple month.

Now i was planning on washing it, waxing it and then throwing on a cover, but should i do anything else? I'll probably drive it down the street every now and again make sure the tires don't develop a flat spot and the battery doesn't die. Do i need to add any type of additives in the oil or gas? Oh and it's going to be parked outside FYI. No garage at the new house yet
 

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I usually just park it - try to keep it as clean as possible and only take it out for a quick spin and wash when the salt is 100% washed off the roads. As long as you wash the salt off before it can dry out, and you repeat this often you could drive the car through winter, otherwise don't park it and forget it b/c come spring it will not like you. I had my vintage 73' in the garage last winter (as it's where it lives 90% of the year anyways) and this year I plan to make room on the otherside for the newly aquired 86' 9000. I had my geo in the garage the nights before snow fall as to save myself the trouble of cleaning it off in the AM. The key locks on a GEO freeze up VERY easily.... :( I've had to take different cars to work b/c of that.

If you plan to park it and forget it - less then 1/2 tank of fuel is more ideal, and toss in a little fuel stabilizer just to make sure.

Diconnecting the battery is a good idea as well - otherwise come spring it'll be dead if you don't try and start it every now and again.
 

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I've always just topped off my Viggen and cleaned it.

Don't start it up once a month or whatever, just let it sit for the winter.

Probably take the battery out and bring it inside and put it on a tender, or if you don't have a tender - charge it overnight once a month to keep it fresh.

You can air the tires up extra if you are worried about flat spots, but honestly that doesn't really happen anymore with new tire technology.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I usually just park it - try to keep it as clean as possible and only take it out for a quick spin and wash when the salt is 100% washed off the roads. As long as you wash the salt off before it can dry out, and you repeat this often you could drive the car through winter, otherwise don't park it and forget it b/c come spring it will not like you. I had my vintage 73' in the garage last winter (as it's where it lives 90% of the year anyways) and this year I plan to make room on the otherside for the newly aquired 86' 9000. I had my geo in the garage the nights before snow fall as to save myself the trouble of cleaning it off in the AM. The key locks on a GEO freeze up VERY easily.... :( I've had to take different cars to work b/c of that.

If you plan to park it and forget it - less then 1/2 tank of fuel is more ideal, and toss in a little fuel stabilizer just to make sure.

Diconnecting the battery is a good idea as well - otherwise come spring it'll be dead if you don't try and start it every now and again.
I've always just topped off my Viggen and cleaned it.

Don't start it up once a month or whatever, just let it sit for the winter.

Probably take the battery out and bring it inside and put it on a tender, or if you don't have a tender - charge it overnight once a month to keep it fresh.

You can air the tires up extra if you are worried about flat spots, but honestly that doesn't really happen anymore with new tire technology.
Thanks for the info guys. Pulling the battery and keeping it on a tender is probably a good idea and I'm pretty sure my brother has one he used for his bike. I'll definitly make sure to add fuel stabalizer. Should i put anything in the oil?
 

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You can air the tires up extra if you are worried about flat spots, but honestly that doesn't really happen anymore with new tire technology.
No? Cause I have seen it plenty - but they sit for more then 1 season too. If the tires are older also they can start to dry rot on the bottom side where moisture builds up and dirt collects...

Put the car on jack stands if you REALLY want to be fancy.
 

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I would do all the service before you put it up. So she is all ready to go in the spring. All you will have to do is fire it up. I'd also go pick up a car cover so the melting snow can't leave water marks. Good luck -Kyle
 

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I usually park mine with a full tank of gas, disconnect the battery and cover it up. You don't need to do anything to the oil and I wouldn't bother starting it up. Mine sits from November to April every year and I've never had an issue.
 

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-Put some gas stabilizer in the tank and fill it with gas.
-Pull your plugs and put a couple drops of motor oil in each cylinder, then put the plugs back in.
-disconnect the battery (leave it in the car). (If you pull the battery, don't leave it on a concrete floor, it will drain it.)
-put in fresh motor oil and a new filter.

This is generally for long-term storage, but you can lift the car too if you want. This keeps the tires from getting flat spots. Jack the car and put two jack stands under the rear axle so that the tires are just off the ground. Jack the front and put the jack stands below the lower ball joints. You want to make sure the suspension isn't sprung for the whole winter. Don't block the car so that the wheels are "hanging" from the suspension.

Worst problem is rodents.
-CLEAN THE INTERIOR COMPLETELY. Any food crumbs or candy wrappers in the car (don't forget the ashtray) will attract critters. If you have carpeted floor mats, put them in a sealed up garbage bag in the trunk.
-cover the end of your tailpipe and your intake with plastic bags and rubber bands.
-Get some Shake-Away rodent repellent, some styrofoam bowls, and some old stockings. I put a little repellent in the bowls and place them in each of the foot areas in the car, the trunk, and on top of the battery and the intake manifold under the hood. I also place a bowl behind each tire on the ground. Take the old stockings, cut them up and make small sachets full of Shake Away by tying the ends together (should be about the size of a golf ball). Stuff the sachets under the front hood insulation. Mice love to nest up in there. They pull it apart to make nests and fill the area with maple seeds and things. You can also stuff some sachets any place you think mice might use as access to the car.

Other people will recommend dryer sheets and moth balls--to each his own--but in my experience, they don't work any where near as well as Shake Away which was designed for the purpose. Once the meeces have eaten your hood insulation or your carpet, it's too late to find out that you should have went the Shake Away route.
 

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A neat little trick is to put pieces of plywood under each tire, just in case you're worried about flat spots.
 

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I have been using StabIL each winter, cheap insurance.

I also find the odd day when it winds up being a 50+ degree day even in the dead of winter. So I try and take it out for a bit on days like that. This year may be a bit different since the car may not be running since it might be in the middle of a supercharger install.
 
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