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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I have a 2000 9-5 AERO and trying to determine which is the best oil to use in the North East climate for a demanding (500 HWY miles/week) with open air and .88 gap on plugs. According to the HAYNES SAAB 9-5 Serv/Rep manual it recommends Viscosity 0W30. :confused:Any suggestions?
 

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do not use 0w30. use 5w40. rotella 5w40 turbo diesel or mobil 1 5w40 tdt will do the job. or if you want you can shell out the extra $$$ for amsoil. or you could run mobil 1 0w40 but people talk about that having shearing issues. so i would run a 5w40
 

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Go with a 0w-30 should be fine especially because you'll probably drive at least 5k before the weather is any warmer. 0w-40 is fine and what's recommended on my 9-3, but we have the same engines so I don't see what the difference would be due to.
 

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do not use 0w30. use 5w40. rotella 5w40 turbo diesel or mobil 1 5w40 tdt will do the job. or if you want you can shell out the extra $$$ for amsoil. or you could run mobil 1 0w40 but people talk about that having shearing issues. so i would run a 5w40
What's wrong with 0w-30? It's cold over here. High of 16*F tomorrow lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thanks All, excellent advise, I visited the AMSOIL website and plugged in my info and here's what it offers:
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2000 SAAB 9-5 2.3L 4-cyl Engine Code B235R G Turbo
LUBRICANTS & FLUIDS: Lookup Another Vehicle
PLEASE NOTE: This vehicle's engine has been reported to be prone to sludge.
The use of AMSOIL synthetic motor oils, at regular drain intervals established
by the vehicle manufacturer, will reduce the likelihood of sludge formation,
provide the best protection, and ensure that the vehicle manufacturer
honors any extended warranty. For more information regarding this topic,
read the AMSOIL Technical Services Bulleting by clicking on the following link:
Sludge Issues
Engine Oil
Grade 1......SJ[1]
Maximum Performance Signature Series 0W-30 100% Synthetic Motor Oil (SSOQT)
Maximum Performance SAE 10W-30 Synthetic Motor Oil (ATMQT)
Performance Plus XL 10W-30 Synthetic Motor Oil (XLTQT)
Performance Synthetic 10W30 OE Motor Oil (OETQT) Above 59 F......15W-50, 20W-50
All TEMPS......10W-30, 10W-40 [2]
Below -4 F......5W-30, 5W-40 [3]


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Since I demand much from my car I only want the best! The question is, should I use different formulas in winter as in summer and which AMSOIL weight is recommended?
 

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What's wrong with 0w-30? It's cold over here. High of 16*F tomorrow lol.
lol you call that cold? thats sometimes the average in mn winter. saab recommends a 0w-40 thats why i say not to use the 30. Saab left the 30 for a reason. people say it doesnt give enough oil pressure and bla bla bla stuff i cant remember. other people know more about it than me. 0w40 is good if your worried about the cold. 0w40 or 5w40 whatever floats your boat.
 

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I use castrol syntec 10W-40 all year round since i got the car 70k miles ago. It currently has 140k on it. But i'll be switching to castrol edge once it comes out in that viscosity in the near future.
 

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...W means cold temps such as cold starting. The second number is tested at/above 210 degrees farenheit.


The farther the split between the two number the higherthe viscosifier content and less oil. Viscosifiers shear out fast leading to sludge, and a thinner oil at operating temps.

Mobil 1 is known for this.

0 weights have a great potential to although have good cold flow a) drain out of the top of the engine and give you dry starts or b)shear under starting conditions if not changed very religiously.
 

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That is a load of manure...come on...BMW M3 uses 0-60...are they going to explode in cold weather ?
Manure eh?

You should do some reading.

First off m3 fill is 10w60, the only reason being that under factory service intervals it shears down to a normal weight, after they were having issues spinning bearings with lighter oils shearing down due to high heat/tight tolerances etc at 15k change intervals. Factory approved is also Tws which is a group 4 almost racing oil. Europeans have higher grade standards than we do.

Amsoil, Rp, and Germany castrol are the only true group 4's. M1 claims it but my oil analysis results don't make me comfortable.

Also of note Mobil 1 0w-30, 5w-30, and 10w-30 are NOT ACEA A3 aka they are known as being on the very thin side of 30.

So before you listen to someone say "oh it's fine the bmw's don't blow up", do some independent thinking.
 

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further more

Drawbacks of Viscosity Improving additives
Multi-grade motor oils perform a great service not being too thick at cold startup to prevent engine wear by providing more instantaneous oil flow to critical engine parts. However, there is a draw back. These additives shear back in high heat or during high shear force operation and break down causing some sludging. What's worse is once the additive begins to be depleted the motor oil no long resists thinning so now you have a thinner motor oil at 210 degrees. Your 10W-30 motor oil can easily become a 10W-20 or even a SAE 10 (10W-10) motor oil. I don't have to tell you why that is bad. The more VI additives the worse the problem which is why auto manufacturers decided to steer car owners away from motor oils loaded with VI additives like the 10W-40 and 20W-50 viscosities.

The less change a motor oil has from high to low temperatures gives it a high Viscosity Index. Synthetic motor oils that are made from Group IV (4) PAO base stocks have Viscosity Indexes of more than 150 because they are manufactured to be a lubricant and don't have the paraffin that causes the thickening as they cool. But petroleum based motor oils (Group I (1) & II (2)) usually have Viscosity Indexes of less than 140 because they tend to thicken more at the colder temperature due to the paraffin despite the addition of Viscosity Improving additives. The higher the Viscosity Index number the less thinning and thickening the motor oil has. In other words, high number good, low number bad. Low numbers thicken more as they cool and thin more hot. You see these Viscosity Index ratings posted on data sheets of motor oils provided by the manufacturer.

As already mentioned, VI improving additives can shear back under pressure and high heat conditions leaving the motor oil unable to protect the engine properly under high heat conditions and cause sludging. Also there is a limit to how much viscosity improving additives can be added without affecting the rest of the motor oil's chemistry. Auto manufacturers have moved away from some motor oils that require a lot of viscosity improving additives, like the 10W-40 and 20W-50 motor oils, to blends that require less viscosity additives like the 5W-20, 5W-30 and 10W-30 motor oils. Because stress loads on multi viscosity motor oils can also cause thinning many racers choose to use a straight weight petroleum racing motor oil or a PAO based Synthetic which do not have the VI additives. But only the Group IV (4) PAO based synthetics don't need VI additives. Read on to learn why:

What about synthetic motor oils? Do they need Viscosity Additives?
Group IV (4) and Group V (5) base oil (synthetics) are chemically made from uniform molecules with no paraffin and don't need Viscosity Additives. However, in recent years Group III (3) based oils have been labeled "synthetic" through a legal loophole. These are petroleum based Group II (2) oils that have had the sulfur refined out making them more pure and longer lasting. Group III (3) "synthetic" motor oils must employ Viscosity Additives being petroleum based.

Group V (5) based synthetics are usually not compatible with petroleum or petroleum fuels and have poor seal swell. These are used for air compressors, hydraulics, etc. It's the Group IV (4) PAO based synthetics that make the best motor oils. They are compatible with petroleum based oils and fuels plus they have better seal swell than petroleum. Typically PAO based motor oils use no Viscosity Additives yet pass the multi-grade viscosity requirements as a straight weight! This makes them ideal under a greater temperature range. One advantage of not having to employ Viscosity Improving additives is having a more pure undiluted lubricant that can be loaded with more longevity and performance additives to keep the oil cleaner longer with better mileage/horsepower.
 
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