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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2000 9-3 Viggen

Mine is leaking out the boots, have a used one on order from a member here.

Might go ahead and try to take it out tonight.

What's the procedure? Out the wheel well?

Anything special need to be removed first?


After the new one is in, what needs to be done to get the system working again...bleed of some sort or does it self bleed?

What fluid should I be using? I had been using some valvoline stuff at the auto parts store to fill up every month or so as it would leak out.
 

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Pentosin for fluid: CHF11S

Hope you've been soaking those hard lines and have some flare wrenches!

When I changed my lower PS line, I filled the system back up and rotated the steering wheel from lock to lock a few times, refilled and repeated till the level stayed constant.

You unbolting the tie rods from the knuckles or the rack? If from the rack, there is this pain in the ass locking plate over the bolt heads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well I would guess the tie rods need to come off the rack at some point - need to get on the new one.

I have not been soaking the lines, but do have flare wrenches. Will shoot it tonight before I get started on it.
 

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Here you go... If you want the few pictures the WIS instructions include PM me your email address and I will send you the PDF. Looks pretty straightforward. Good luck!

WIS: Saab 9-3 Steering Rack R&R (LHD) said:
To Remove:
  1. Slightly lift the front assembly.
  2. Remove the brace between the MacPherson struts.
  3. Undo the main fuse box and put it to one side.
  4. Remove the lower dashboard panel including the data link connector on the driver's side.
  5. Remove the steering shaft lock bolt.
    WARNING
    Secure the steering wheel to avoid damaging the contact roller (coil spring).
    If the basic position of the contact roller is disturbed, the spiral conductor in the roller will be damaged when the steering wheel is turned full-lock. The airbag will then fail to function, causing risk for injury in the event of a collision.
    NOTE
    One way to secure the steering wheel is to tape it to the dashboard with heavy-duty adhesive tape of fabric-backed type.
  6. Turn the steering wheel to the straight-ahead position.
  7. Lift off the steering shaft from the pinion shaft.
  8. Cut the cable tie between the return hose and the pressure hose and separate the two hoses.
  9. Detach and plug the return hose from the steering gear. Pinch together the hose with hose pinch-off pliers 30 07 739. Bend the hose to one side.
  10. Detach the delivery pipe from the steering gear. Use spanner 89 96 738. Undo the return pipe and put it to one side so that the delivery pipe nipple can be accessed with the tool. Plug the hole in the steering gear. Wipe away oil spill with a cloth.
  11. Remove the lock plate and undo the steering arm on the steering gear.
  12. Remove right and left mounting brackets.
  13. Remove the bulkhead seal.
  14. Lift up the steering gear through the engine bay.
To Fit:
  1. Transfer the return pipe to the new steering gear. Do not tighten the pipe.
  2. Fit the rubber bushing (lubricated with petroleum jelly) to the left mounting bracket.
  3. Position the steering gear in the engine bay.
  4. Fit the right mounting bracket with rubber bushing loosely to the bulkhead.
  5. Fit the bulkhead seal. Position the groove in the seal against the groove in the steering gear.
  6. Fit the left mounting bracket first. Make sure the smooth surface of the steering gear is against the bulkhead partition. Tighten the bolts (apply Loctite 242, part no. 749 6268, to the mounting bracket bolt).
    Tightening torque: 24 Nm (18 lbf ft)
    IMPORTANT
    It is extremely important that the steering gear mounting brackets are fitted in the correct order. Otherwise, the steering gear can be fitted in such a position that the angle to the steering column fitting is incorrect.
  7. Tighten the right mounting bracket with a torque wrench (apply Loctite 242, part no. 749 6268, to the mounting bracket bolt).
    Tightening torque: 24 Nm (18 lbf ft)
  8. Fit the suspension arms to the steering gear and tighten them. A new lock plate must be fitted each time the steering gear has been removed from the car.
    Tightening torque: 93 Nm (69 lbf ft)
  9. Remove the plug and fit the delivery pipe to the steering gear and tighten it. Tighten also the return pipe horizontally.
    Tightening torque: 28 Nm (21 lbf ft)
  10. Remove the plug from the return hose and fit it to the steering gear.
  11. Fit a new cable tie between the return hose and the pressure hose and fix them together.
  12. Fit the main fuse box.
  13. Fit the brace between the MacPherson struts.
    Remove the tape securing the steering wheel and fit the steering shaft to the pinion shaft. Tighten the lock bolt.
    Tightening torque: 24 Nm (18 lbf ft)
    WARNING
    If the position of the steering wheel has changed, the contact roller (coil spring) must be adjusted. See group 8, Airbag, "Adjustment and replacement" .
  14. Fit the lower dashboard panel including the data link connector on the driver's side.
  15. Lower the car and turn the wheels to point straight ahead.
  16. Fill the hydraulic fluid reservoir with the specified fluid. Start the engine, turn the steering wheel to the right and left lock positions 2-3 times. Turn off the engine and correct the fluid level. At 20°C, it should be in between the MAX and MIN markings on the dipstick in the hydraulic fluid reservoir.
  17. Check for leaks at the control valve couplings.
  18. Make sure the steering wheel is positioned "straight ahead" when the car is steering straight ahead on a level road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well I got it out.

New one hasn't arrived in the mail yet.

I did most everything according to that guide you posted, except the part about the steering wheel. I've definitely moved it after it was disconnected (not much, just wiggle back and forth), so hopefully I didn't mess up the airbag! Wonder if there is a way to tell?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here you go... If you want the few pictures the WIS instructions include PM me your email address and I will send you the PDF. Looks pretty straightforward. Good luck!
WARNING
If the position of the steering wheel has changed, the contact roller (coil spring) must be adjusted. See group 8, Airbag, "Adjustment and replacement" .
Any chance you could post this, just in case I need to do it?
 

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If all you did was wiggle it back and forth (like a quarter turn each direction), but then you replaced it to the center position you don't have to worry about anything.

If you've spun the steering wheel around more then a turn, you probably want to re-align the clock spring (and hopefully you didn't go far enough to break it, iirc something like 2 turns from center in either direction).

To re-align the clock spring:
Disconnect the battery and wait 15 minutes (not really necessary, but a good practice when working with airbags)
Unscrew the two T30 screws under the plastic caps in the side of the steering wheel.
Remove the air bag.
Carefully disconnect the electrical connectors to the airbag and horn/steering wheel controls.
Loosen the steering wheel retainer nut, but leave it threaded at the end of the stud (this way you can pound on the back of the steering wheel until it pops free without having to worry about snapping one of the connectors off of the clock spring).
Once the wheel is popped free, remove the nut completely and carefully feed the electrical connectors through the hole in the wheel.

Now you can re-align the clock spring. Carefully rotate it all the way counter clockwise, until you feel some resistance. Now count the turns as you rotate it all the way clockwise. Now simply rotate it back half the amount. IIRC it is something like 2 turns.

Now the clock spring is centered. You can then recenter the steering shaft, by placing the master spline at the 12 O'clock position. You can now reinstall the wheel, or wait until you have the steering shaft bolted back up to the new rack.

You may be able to do all of this with the wheel on, but with the added leverage of the wheel, it will be very easy to break the clock spring.
 

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Didn't catch this post before I left for work. It's pretty east to fix the contact spiral.
Edit: I was beat!


Disconnect battery
Wait 15 minutes
Remove air bag, mind the wires
Loosen steering wheel nut
Rock wheel to loosen from splines
Remove nut
Remove wheel
Gently rotate contact spiral to find limits to left and right
Find center based on both limits (count turns)
Bolt everything back together

This is how I remember it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Excellent thanks guys, I did not turn the wheel much and it is currently sitting in the same position as when I disconnected the rack, my fears have been lowered!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This Pentosin stuff is stupid expensive... how many bottles do I need? I got 2 preemptively. System would be mostly empty.

What happens if you mix it with an off the shelf PS fluid? I was topping off for the last 2 years with just a generic fluid..Didn't seem to cause any ill effects.
 

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marty tried taking the rack out of the wheel well on my white car, was a pain in the ass. far easier to remove the strut tower bar and pull it out through the top
 

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I pulled the lower cooler line on my NG. I had it off for like 20 minutes, in that time only about 3/4 of a bottle drained out. I also had the reservoir out to clean it. I'd imagine the system was pretty well drained. So hopefully two cans is more then enough.
 

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All GM dealers now cary pentosin, Ask the parts department for "GM Hydro/Electric" power steering Fluid. Its just the pentosin can with a GM Sticker over the green print on the can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Is this return line pictured here with the red arrow, in the proper hole? Saab made the threads the same for these 2 holes... lame. The other open hole would have the hard line which I assume is the high pressure.

 
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