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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
The replacement bushings need to be pressed in and old bushings pressed out! From my standpoint there was no other option, so buy a press or visit someone willing to help.

The seals and o rings are soaking in PS fluid. I sourced the pipe to press the hydraulic seal on the rack so that's coming out tonight.

Here are the new rack bushings pressed in

 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Rack is out.

Removing the snap ring was a bit of a bear but it's out.

Use a metal pipe 1/4 in. ID and 7 6/16th long (exactly. This replaces the special tool to compress the hydraulic seal in order to move the tip of the snap ring.

Once the seal was compressed, I did the following to remove the snap ring:

1. Use a pick tool and poke inside the nipple at the end of the rack housing furthest from the pinion. This will move the snap ring about 1 or 2 mm (that's it!). Work space is extremely tight.

2. Next , the Manual suggests using guitar string to loop the snap ring. I used a metal tape measure bent in half to loop the tip snap ring.

3. Then used a dental pick tool to push the tape measure around the snap ring to about 3 o'clock

4. Then I pulled like hell until the snap ring stretched

5. Then grabbed my big vice grips and pulled the ring out.



Rack and hydraulic seals removed



Now just need to clean the rack shaft and servo with kerosene and replace the rack snd pinion with mew seals. The o ring on the seal was definitely leaking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
So far I'm in $23 for the seal kit, and $8.00 for the pipe fitting from Home Depot.
 

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So far I'm in $23 for the seal kit, and $8.00 for the pipe fitting from Home Depot.
....and as much as I admire your enthusiasm for repairing the rack yourself, you have definitely convinced me that buying a reman for $200 and dropping it in is the way to go.

Don't get me wrong, I'm as skilled as the next guy with tools and ability, but that just looks like a slow, drawn-out pain in the ass that would be really easy to mess up. Kudos though.:th_coolio:
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
....and as much as I admire your enthusiasm for repairing the rack yourself, you have definitely convinced me that buying a reman for $200 and dropping it in is the way to go.

Don't get me wrong, I'm as skilled as the next guy with tools and ability, but that just looks like a slow, drawn-out pain in the ass that would be really easy to mess up. Kudos though.:th_coolio:
I won't argue that. I have been very pandentic with this job so it compliments my past efforts, and when you have spend $200 many times over 2 years you begin to look for ways not to part with that cash.

I need every penny for paint and a new top so for me it makes sense to rebuild.

Plus the experience is priceless. Now I can see how the rack is built and where the leaks may be coming from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
....and as much as I admire your enthusiasm for repairing the rack yourself, you have definitely convinced me that buying a reman for $200 and dropping it in is the way to go.io:
Be honest, who smiled more. Andy Dufrain after he came up with the scheme of doing rhe guards taxes as a merhod to get beer for his fellow prison mates, or the other cons that drank the beer provided by Andy's out of the box scheme that actually worked?? Lol....
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 · (Edited)
Let's put the rack back together now.

If this was my primary focus it would have been done within a few hours. But doing other things and having never did this before, I don't mind dragging it out a bit.

I will also increase the difficulty level to 6 since it was a bit figgidy getting the snap ring out but nothing to go crazy about.

These seals, snap rings, and O rings is what will be replaced. The pinion and needle bearings I will reuse.

I'm to the comfort level with the rack that I could put it all back without the manual but I won't do that.



I'm taking the day off so I will begin to rebuild md have it done this afternoon with new boots.

Those seals are rack and valve related only. None of the line O rings have been touched yet, but all will be replaced..
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
The seal above with the lump of grease on it, lives inside the rack, just about mid way. It needs to be pushed out from the pinion side using. 21 mm socket and a 2" ft extension. Don't use 22mm or it could get stuck and you don't want that.... Lol....tap it out with a mechanics mallet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Dropping the inner ball joints in petrol and degreaser ( my DIY hot tank concoction) until I get all the seals in. The joints should be nice and clean by then.

There was no play with them when installed so they can be re used as well.

 

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Discussion Starter · #30 · (Edited)
Starting on a clean T :D, here is the rack n pinion assembly line.

All new seals, orings, and snap rings, are in order as they should be installed. Rqck and valve are clean as well as that breather pipe.

Also pictured are new outer tie rod ends and boots. The servo feed and return lines are also cleaned up.

The rack housing is soaking. Being pedantic is the key to success. Take your time, be methodical and MAN THE MACHINE!!!

As Mike D told me when wiring T5, "it's just wires man!"

Then in this case, "it's just metal and rubber gentlemen!"

 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Getting back to this.

I totally killed the PTFE seals (basically Teflon orings) because I didn't understand how they work.

I bit the billet and bought four new ones. $20 so the rebuild is still below $80.

Did a google search and learned how to install them properly.

Now just need to drive the pinion shaft home after I seat the lower seal pictured in the pinion housing.

To fit Teflon orings properly you should boil them stretch to fit and then use your heat gun to shrink. Worked a treat...

 

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Holy thread resurrection, Batman!

So I tried this. It's a great tutorial, as far as taking things apart goes. Putting them back together on the other hand......well yeah you'll see.

I consider myself a veteran home-remanufacturer of Saab parts, having done two starters, three alternators, an A/C compressor, and a whole slew of brake calipers and master/slave cylinders. I figured this would be a walk in the park. I wasn't doing it to save money. I was just doing it "for fun". Yeah.

I obtained a used rack (cast iron pinion housing) from a friend who was scrapping a rusty 900. I used about half a bottle of orange degreaser and a good half roll of paper towels getting the thing clean enough to work on. I started by scraping grime off it in gucky black strips with an old chisel.

Getting the seal out was easy. I used a piece of PVC pipe to compress the wavy spring and got at the snap ring with two bicycle spokes: one to push the ring in and one bent and filed into a pointy hook to grab the ring and pull it out.

So far so good. On to rebuilding.

I bought the Edelmann 8740 kit. The last one from Rockauto. This is the kit sold everywhere, under myriad different names, so don't tell me I got a junky kit. They are literally all the same.

First seal to hammer in, in my opinion, is the bottom pinion seal, which goes in the pinion housing. This was also where I first ran into trouble. The seal included in the kit was the wrong size. I also bought and returned another kit, from a different brand and a different store, which was clearly the same kit, with the same wrong seal. Why, Edelmann? Why?

So I was off to part numbers. The bottom pinion seal I took out was a 26005161. The new seal was smaller. So i cross-referenced and got "Opel Corsa, Sintra" on a part number list. Tha fack? So I looked for a rack seal kit for the Corsa and Sintra. Easy enough to find, but hard to get in the USA. On a Russian website, the same kit was listed for Corsa and Sintra as for a '94 Firebird Trans Am. Bingo. I ordered the Trans Am kit from Autozone (so I could return it if the needed seal was the wrong size). The seal in question was the right size. This took a week. But I now have a full seal kit. I'll keep you posted if it worked. Even if nobody really cares. For posterity and because there's got to be someone out there with a rack they are dying to rebuild.
 

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So I drove in some seals.

First I put in the white little collar thingy that goes deep inside the pinion housing. This can be slipped in with your finger. Use the one from the Pontiac Trans Am kit. That's 8785 from Edelmann or Autozone or wherever. Then, the pinion seal I got in the Trans Am kit. I used a socket extension mounted backwards on a socket. I think it's the one I use for crank pulley installation/removal on 900 cars after 87.
IMG_20170802_132705961.jpg

It fits!! And appears to seat well in the little hole. I can feel the hole's chamfer with my bicycle spoke pick tool. The seal and plastic collar will be the only components I use from the Pontiac kit.

NEXT the rack seal. I put the teflon seal on the rack bar piston, with the O-ring underneath it in the same groove. Some racks have just a teflon seal, and the SAAB kit comes with both types. Then I put the rack bar seal on the rack bar. The rack bar is used as a seal driver to seat the seal, so you don't have to use a socket for this part. I put electrical tape over the teeth of the rack to keep them from gouging up the seal, and oiled and slid the seal down the rack bar.
IMG_20170802_134812267.jpg

Once the seal was at the end, I checked the seal to see if it was nicked, by pushing it up the rack bar with a little oil ahead of it. I then inspected the oil ring, to see if any oil was going past. It appeared fine.
IMG_20170802_135028019.jpg

Finally, the rack bar was ready. I pushed it carefully into the rack housing, teeth first, and used a hammer and socket to pound on the end of the rack bar until the seal was driven home. There is no way to tell from the outside if this seal is seated, so you have to take note of where the seal sits when you've inserted the rack bar versus where it sits once you've pounded it home. It should move about 5 or 6mm.

Next I will do the bulkhead seal/wavy washer/snap ring.
 

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Allahu Rack-Bar!

The rack bar bulkhead seal is fully in. Here's how I did it.

First, of course, you have to insert the bushing (smaller nosed end inward) followed by the wavy washer followed by the bulkhead seal assembly, with the new seal you hammered in it with a socket or pipe. Once these are on the rack bar and seated a ways down in the rack, you will need to compress the bulkhead seal/wavy washer.

I did use a pipe to compress the bulkhead seal/wavy washer, like B202nut. But I used PVC instead of metal. Easier to cut if I got the length wrong and plenty strong enough. Also no burrs to cut me!
IMG_20170805_163049395.jpg

The way you do this is really easy. Just cut a pipe to be the appropriate length, then put it on over the rack bar. You will need to have the driver's side inner tie rod end screwed on. You will then screw on the passenger's side inner tie rod end until it pushes up against the pipe, like so:
IMG_20170805_163030153.jpg

You will feel some resistance as the bulkhead seal assembly slides its o-ring past the snap ring groove. It is good to oil or grease everything before doing this so you don't pinch the o-ring or anything. Once the o-ring is past the snap ring groove, all you have to do is tighten the tie rod a bit more until you can see the groove. Then slide the snap ring in using a small screwdriver. Make sure it's seated all the way around the rack. Luckily they give you a new one of these so you can ruin the old one taking it apart and not have a bad time bending it back into the right shape so it seats properly.

Next, the pinion goes in!
 

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A bird in the hand is worth two bushes in the rack...whatever, something like that

Pressed bushings in. B202nut got this wrong when he said you need a press. Then again, I've been working without any presses for years. It's just a fact of life for me, the necessity to think outside the box. Humblebrag aside, it really is easy.

To press the old ones out, just take a big socket (big enough that the bushing can go in it) and put it on the bottom side of the rack, then find a bolt that is nice and short that your vise can push against, clamp the stack of rack+socket +bolt together, and start cranking. You could probably do this with a C-clamp too. These are not really in there that hard.
IMG_20170806_114843503.jpg

N.B. the bushings can only come out the bottom and are directional. The end of the bushing with more metal showing is fatter than the hole in the rack and can't go through the hole, and should be against the car's frame when the rack is installed.

Once you've got the bushing halfway out, you can just clamp the bushing in the vise and yank on it until it slides out.

Then put in the new bushing. I use dish soap to lubricate them because people say oil is bad for them. Could probably also use K-Y but I don't want to waste mine. Apply soap, clamp bushing+rack, and crank until through.
IMG_20170806_114316685.jpg

Finally, this won't push the bushing in completely. So you'll have put a socket on the end and push the bushing a bit out the other side, like so:
IMG_20170806_114526538.jpg

Boom, you're done. Spool valve next. I promise.
 

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My o-pinion on spool-ing up

Installed the pinion/spool valve today. Easy!

First I'll say, those directions by B202nut to use heat to form the teflon o-rings: not the thing I did. I pulled the old ones off and put the new ones on by gently stretching them by hand. Just enough so they'd go over the spool valve and into their grooves. But then they were really loose. What to do??? Allow me to show you my marvelous solution:
IMG_20170813_110729506.jpg

I zip-tied cardboard around the seals and then really cranked on the zip ties. I bet you could use hose clamps too but zip ties have less chance of cutting through the cardboard and into the vulnerable ptfe.

Then use socket to seat the lower bearing. Put in the lower bearing's snap ring.
IMG_20170813_110656534.jpg

Then put the spool valve in. Repair manual says it better than I could, so here's a screen shot.
Screen Shot 2017-08-13 at 9.59.58 PM.png
Basically first make sure the rack is centered (about 39mm sticking out either side, not counting the threads). Start the pinion/spool valve with the notch facing left (9:00), then the helical-cut pinion will turn 90 degrees as you insert it and end up facing up (high noon). You'll feel the ptfe seals slip past the chamfer inside the pinion housing as you push it in. If it doesn't go in by hand, STOP and figure out why.

Drop in the roller bearing and then hammer home the two upper seals with a socket. Put the upper pinion snap ring in. Tighten the bottom nut, put the cap on. Make sure things are well-greased. I used black moly lithium grease. It's probably overkill but it's all I had lying around.

Screw on the tie-rod ends. It is pointless to re-use your old ones. New ones are cheap and nearly impossible to change in-car. Why take the risk? Use a pipe wrench on their flats. Tighten to 75 ft-lbs (wheel nut torque if you're doing things by feel because you lack a ginormous crowfoot). Peen the sleeve part over the flats of the rack using a large punch.

Putting on the tie-rod boots should be done last. It is something I really do have an opinion about. First, don't reuse your old tie rod boots. Seriously don't be a nincompoop. They are vulnerable rubber, and really hard to change when the rack is in the car. Then, you must check the boots you have purchased. A lot of them don't come with the holes for the pressure-equalizing tube punched all the way through. You must ensure that they have been punched, or your rack boots will . Blow on the hole with your mouth. I'm serious. They are a pain to do in-car so you have to make sure they work now. Remember the pressure-equalizing tube. It should run under the two hard lines on the rack. I don't like the zip ties that come with most rack boots, so I managed to reuse the original metal band clamps. They can be tightened with end-cutters provided you do not accidentally cut them.

And you're done! See, it wasn't that hard.

Sticky this thread?
 

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hey

so when you removed the piston ring from the rack shaft there was a thin teflon seal with an o ring under it

thats what my car had, but I wasnt sure if it was rebuilt by someone in the past, maybe incorrectly -??

the manual isnt very clear

but I assume the later models used the thinner (white speckled) teflon seal with the o ring under it which helps adjust for uneven wear of the teflon seal. whereas the original rigid teflon seal in a sliding seal environment would potentially become leaky.

did you slit your pinion seals as per the manuaL?
 

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I bought the Edelmann 8740 kit. The last one from Rockauto. This is the kit sold everywhere, under myriad different names, so don't tell me I got a junky kit. They are literally all the same.

First seal to hammer in, in my opinion, is the bottom pinion seal, which goes in the pinion housing. This was also where I first ran into trouble. The seal included in the kit was the wrong size. I also bought and returned another kit, from a different brand and a different store, which was clearly the same kit, with the same wrong seal. Why, Edelmann? Why?
I think that kit is up to year 1988.
 

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hey

so when you removed the piston ring from the rack shaft there was a thin teflon seal with an o ring under it

thats what my car had, but I wasnt sure if it was rebuilt by someone in the past, maybe incorrectly -??

the manual isnt very clear

but I assume the later models used the thinner (white speckled) teflon seal with the o ring under it which helps adjust for uneven wear of the teflon seal. whereas the original rigid teflon seal in a sliding seal environment would potentially become leaky.
You are correct. Later cars seem to have the PTFE seal with o-ring under. This is not reverse compatible. If yours had an o-ring under a PTFE seal that's what must go back in. It's impossible to fit the solid PTFE seal to a car that came with the o-ring under PTFE, and impossible to do the opposite as well. I am pretty sure your rack is stock.

Newer cars of other make (not Saabs) also use o-rings under the pinion seals as well.

did you slit your pinion seals as per the manuaL?
Oh hell no. I think the slitting procedure is a modification to allow the seals to seal better against a worn aluminum housing. With the cast iron housing, I think it's not necessary.
 
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