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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Guys, my car just failed inspection for brakes. Somehow the inner pad was completely gone while the outer pad had some body left(how is this even possible???) anyway I decided I'm gonna do all 4.

The fronts are pretty self explanatory but I'm wondering about the rears....they are 2 piston...how do you retract the pistons? My usual method of using a c clamp doesn't seem to apply here. Also don't the pistons have to be pushed back simultaneously? I know Saab sold a tool at one point but I doubt I can get one on short notice!

Thanks!

EDIT: I think the consensus is that I have a stuck caliper(front right). If theres anyone in either the NYC or Albany area that can help me replace the front calipers, bleed the system, and change pads/rotors on all 4, please let me know. I'll pay, $$ or beer/food, whatever your choice is!
 

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you need a new caliper, it is more than likely sticking.

to do the rears, tap out the two pins, remove the spring, draw the pads out the back and the unbolt and remove the caliper. (saabsite has a tutorial)

i suggest a new hardware kit also.
 

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Brakes are super easy to bleed, plus you should if the fluid is old, you would be surprised how much the rubber lines degrade and stick your calipers ;) When I did the rear lines on my Saab they were filled with small black particles of rubber from the lines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Never done it so I'm afraid to mess with something that is important like brakes. Anyone near NY/nj wanna help? I'll come to you!
 

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Well if you have to do it yourself it is MUCH easier when there are 2 people to begin with if you dont have an automatic self-bleeder, and always remember to keep the master cylinder filled so you dont suck in air that way and have to start over again. Bleeding the rears is a PITA if your calipers are so rusted that the bleeder screw has to be cut off and CAREFULLY drilled out...................

Also check this it might help you out http://www.wikihow.com/Bleed-Brakes

And always start from the farthest brake from the master, on a US spec saab that should be RR, LR, RF, LF
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for that info! However I would still like the steady hand of guidance from someone who knows what they're doing! Anyone?please? I'll pay you!
 

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Thanks for that info! However I would still like the steady hand of guidance from someone who knows what they're doing! Anyone?please? I'll pay you!
If you buy my plane ticket to you I would do it :D although I think you can find cheaper than a ticket from Austria to NY and back at your place LOL good luck!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
you need a new caliper, it is more than likely sticking.

to do the rears, tap out the two pins, remove the spring, draw the pads out the back and the unbolt and remove the caliper. (saabsite has a tutorial)

i suggest a new hardware kit also.
Don't you need to push the pistons back in or is this caliper different?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think most ford cars just have that threaded piston.

I'm thinking more about pushing the pistons in so that I can put the new pads in and it'll fit around the rotor when I go to put it all back.

Or does the rear caliper work dififerently?
 

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The rear on these cars pushes in, not threads. Its fairly easy with two people. The worst part will be the parts cost. Read up, there's lots of advice online. Oh and the platonoff guide has some good stuff. This one is for a 9-5, but the procedure is very similar for the NG900. 09.07.2005: Saab 9-5 rear brakes fixed - photo.platonoff.com

Granted, that doesn't show bleeding the brakes, but it does show most of the steps for getting at your bad caliper. Might be more tips on that site to show you in the brakes section.
 

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I have come across something like this before. I thought mine was frozen too. Turned out the pad was just stuck to the caliper... rust..

1. Take pads out.
2. Take caliper off rotor and rest on box or tie off.
3. Take some wood that will fit in caliper and slowly push each piston back by hand. Take turns on inner and outer. (Don't need a clamp imo)
4. Have a helper very slowly push the brake and watch the pistons. If they both move out your good.
5. Repat step 3 and 4 a couple of times. Helps to have a piece of wood between the pistons so the pistons don't come out too far accidentally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Sorry, I was unclear. My front is the one that I believe is frozen, I just asked about the rears because since I'm doing brakes I will do all 4.
 

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Rears on these cars are dirt dirt simple. Probably the easiest brakes I've ever worked on. If you're just doing the pads, i.e. re-using the rotors, it should take 10 minutes/side once the wheel is off. The only tools you need are a hammer and punch (or thick nail) and a big c-clamp. Pop the pins out with the hammer and punch, tap the pads out, and use the C-clamp to compress the piston back in to the caliper. New pads in, pins in, and you're done. You can (and IMHO should) bleed with the new pads in (bleeding with empty calipers can cause the piston to blow out of the caliper) - the only reason to take the caliper off is if you're replacing the rotor or the caliper or need access to the parking brake hardware behind the rotor.

Also not sure if this is clear or not but it's arguably best practice to bleed all four even if you only "need" to bleed one of the fronts due to breaking the line there.
 
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