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I'll be up in West Chester next Friday for a customer meeting. I'll be sure to wave defiantly at that pile of ferous cancer causing sodium chloride.

(Look for me prolly in the 9-5 wagon)
 

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I don't get it? What is in the garage there... looks like sand or something?

Nice sled BTW!
Road salt. They put it on the roads here in the states by the ton to melt the snow. It's what causes cars up here in the northeast to rust away so quickly. It's gotten more expensive for municipalities to use the stuff, so many places mix it with gravel now so cars get a double whammy--road rash and salt cancer.
 

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Steve, hence the reason why I haven't driven my Sled since early November. There it sits in the garage collecting dust until the spring.
 

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I went to college in Syracuse, NY. Syracuse is known as the Salt City. That's where most of the salt mines are where they get the road salt. I had to replace the exhaust on my car every year that I went to school there. Since salt is so plentiful, they have no qualms about really dumping it on the roads there. Lots of people drive winter beaters. Not like most people think of winter beaters, but cars that seem barely road worthy. It wasn't uncommon to see cars that were missing nearly the entire lower half of their exterior body. I actually saw a car there once that had lumber running under the car and sticking out the front and the back and tied over the top of the car with ropes. I have no idea what that was supposed to accomplish. Probably holding the undercarriage up. :)

The typical central NY winter beater:
 

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I went to college in Syracuse, NY. Syracuse is known as the Salt City. That's where most of the salt mines are where they get the road salt. I had to replace the exhaust on my car every year that I went to school there. Since salt is so plentiful, they have no qualms about really dumping it on the roads there. Lots of people drive winter beaters. Not like most people think of winter beaters, but cars that seem barely road worthy. It wasn't uncommon to see cars that were missing nearly the entire lower half of their exterior body. I actually saw a car there once that had lumber running under the car and sticking out the front and the back and tied over the top of the car with ropes. I have no idea what that was supposed to accomplish. Probably holding the undercarriage up. :)

The typical central NY winter beater:
I go to school in cortland, it is fucking retarded how much salt there is here. I would never drive a nice car during the winter here.
 

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Around here(SW Ohio) they have started using sugar beet juice as a pre-treatment, but salt is still the most effective thing to use.

Cinders and sand aren't used to melt snow, but to aid traction. It's mostly the rural communities that use sand and cinders.
 

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Cinders and sand aren't used to melt snow, but to aid traction. It's mostly the rural communities that use sand and cinders.
They actually do help melt the snow and ice though, even if they aren't meant to. Not as effectively as salt of course. Because the sand and cinders are darker than the snow and ice they cover, the absorb more of the sun's heat, making them warmer than the snow and ice thereby melting them, but only when the sun's out.

However, any and all of these substances make a royal mess out of the roads in the springtime and keep the DOTs of colder climes very busy in April and May!
 

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Here's a question: does salt really "cause" rust on cars that are both properly prepared (waxed before snow flies) and maintained (frequently washed) for the stuff? I understand what it can due to metal, but to me, the effect is at least 10 times worse on vehicles that are poorly taken care of in the first place. Most people never wax or maintain their cars in the first place, and such leads to severe chipping, road wear, etc. Add salt to that equation on a car with no protection and I can see how salt can cause, or speed up significant rust damage. On cars that are well taken care of, meaning waxed before the winter and washed frequently during such, I wonder if salt is really as much of problem as most make it out to be? I think that it would surely cause some minor issues over the years, but I don't see how it can cause major exterior damage if people take care of their vehicles in a preventative fashion. Thoughts?
 

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Frequent washing during the winter, combined with waxing before will certainly help. The problem is that the salt will find it's way into areas which can't be waxed or washed without taking things apart on the car.
 
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