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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1990 Saab 900s (N/A) with 182 on the clock.

So, the leak's been persistent for about at least a month now. Depending on how much I drive, I at least drive 30 miles highway everyday, and probably 20 city on average, I use about a quart. Yea, I'm not having fun constantly checking, and refilling. It's not really cheap either!

So I went and had both the Oil Pump O-Ring replaced, as well as the oil pan gasket and even the Oil Pressure Switch, this I thought slowed down the leaking at first, well at least stuff is running better. But, there's still a leak. My mechanic says it's most likely the Timing Cover (which he said also isn't very common). But what I didn't like about what he said was that it was going to be "at least a 10 hour job" and "would require pulling the whole engine out."

Now is this true? I'm not made of money here, and I bought this car with the intention of not paying more than what I got it for within the first year. Also is there anything else it could be. He also claims that the area the leak's coming from, the only thing there is the timing cover.
 

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probably the main seal against the firewall or the one behind the clutch etc......both you can do without pulling the engine....
 

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If it IS the timing cover, which seems very unlikely but possible, then it would require removing the engine. If it's the front main (crank) seal, then it could be done in the car in about 3 hours. I guess the question is "which is it?". If it is the timing cover, they you may as well also replace the timing components while you're already there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yea and I'm trying to figure out which it is too. If its the timing cover, and it takes that long and requires removal of the engine, then it may not be worth it to fix it, money wise.
 

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Yea and I'm trying to figure out which it is too. If its the timing cover, and it takes that long and requires removal of the engine, then it may not be worth it to fix it, money wise.
Do you have somewhere to work on the car yourself? These are not difficult cars to work on and if you follow the Bentley or get yourself a set of Saab Service Manuals, you can go step by step. Removing the engine offers the opportunity to fix a whole lot of things all at once and usually the result is a very long lasting spell of high reliability in my experience. If it is removed, I'd recommend that the timing chain and guides be replaced, the front and rear main seals be replaced, the motor mounts be replaced (if needed/torn), the head gasket be replaced, the crank position sensor be replaced (if equipped), and the valve cover gasket be replaced. Sounds like a lot, but in parts it would be a few hundred dollars total and money well spent in the long run. You would also benefit from flushing the radiator and heater core since you will have removed the old coolant anyways. In the end, you will have taken car of most of the maintenance items and your Saab should be trouble free for quite some time provided the work is done carefully and correctly (this requires patience and attention to detail).

Of course, this is presuming that the car is worth doing this work to. If it's in otherwise poor condition, it may be better to find one worth doing the work on. A solid Saab worth working on can be very reliable and will last a very long time with a big shot of good maintenance like that.
 

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If you are pulling the motor, don't forget to replace upper control arm bushings (at least on the driver's side). Likely should replace alternator bushings while you're at it.
 

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Do you have an automatic or a 5-speed?

If 5-speed, the front main seal near the clutch can be done with engine in car. If an Auto, you must remove the engine and separate the engine and the tranny to fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well im the definition of less-than-novice mechanic, so I think most of it is out of the question. Even though I'd love to learn, I can't do it on my daily driver. And plus mmoe, I don't have anywhere to work on the car, nor do we have any of those shops you can pay to use their bays. So we'll see what it is, I'm gonna take it to other places and see what they say, and maybe even my one friend at the Saab dealer, can't hurt to get multiple places opinions. And it is an automatic (sadly), so it'd be more labor intensive - ick.
 
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