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Under $50 if you DIY (aerosol matched body paint from paintscratch.com and a can of SprayMax 2k clear aerosol). Probably $150+ if you take it to a shop. If you've got the cash, taking it to a shop would be the least-headaches solution--especially if it needs a little repair work. The OEM tails are some kind of composite and normal body filler doesn't work well on any cracks--they return. You are better off using some 2-part marine resin to repair the cracks--I've been through this. :rolleyes:

Note: if you are DIYing and plan to get some body-matched aerosol from one of the online sources, just get the base color but tell them you are doing a 2-stage paint job. The base will go on matte and then you get the depth and shine with the 2K clear. Don't get the clear that the online places supply. It is usually just duplicolor clear lacquer--the 2K is a better topcoat.
 

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Under $50 if you DIY (aerosol matched body paint from paintscratch.com and a can of SprayMax 2k clear aerosol). Probably $150+ if you take it to a shop. If you've got the cash, taking it to a shop would be the least-headaches solution--especially if it needs a little repair work. The OEM tails are some kind of composite and normal body filler doesn't work well on any cracks. You are better off using some 2-part marine resin to repair the cracks--I've been through this. :rolleyes:

Note: if you are DIYing and plan to get some body-matched aerosol from one of the online sources, just get the base color but tell them you are doing a 2-stage paint job. The base will go on matte and then you get the depth and shine with the 2K clear. Don't get the clear that the online places supply. It is usually just duplicolor clear lacquer--the 2K is a better topcoat.
Excellent suggestion on the DIY option. I've gotten color matched, aerosol urethane paint from paintscratch.com and our local autobody supply store and couldn't recommend it enough. It's easy to use and great for DIY'ers who don't have a paint gun, compressor, etc. In terms of actual paint, all you need is the following:

1. 1 can of Urethane Basecoat (black, I assume). Buy on paintscratch.com if no local autobody supply

2. 1 can of 2k aerosol urethane clear coat....DO NOT BUY THE CLEAR COAT ON PAINTSCRATCH.COM....it is a lacquer and will not produce optimal results. Instead, buy the following:

http://www.repaintsupply.com/pd_2_part_2k_aerosol.cfm

The above is, as turbocon said, about $50 total. With some patience, attention, and research, you can have a professional looking job for 1/3rd the typical cost. I have heard of people painting whole quarters, roofs, etc with the type of above system, so a spoiler will be no problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the input. After my super aero wheel experiment, I am not so sure I want to stay in the painting business, but will consider. (See sand paper progression)
 

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The most important technique to remember when paining with aerosols is to work in steady back and forth motions, just like a spray gun. Start spraying a little to one side of the part, move across it and then take your finger off the tip once it's cleared the other side of the part. Spatter generally happens when you first depress the tip, that's why you want to start off to one side a bit.

When doing wheels, I usually spray in horizontal strokes with just a light misting. Paint the wheel that way, then rotate it a quarter turn and do it again. Then do that two more times. You won't get any skipped spots.

Don't move the can in a circular motion as you're spraying. You'll get spatter and runny spots. Shake the b'jezus out of the can before starting, and between coats--not while spraying.
 

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Basecoat is easy to apply, just as turbocon explained. The more challenging to spray is the clearcoat. I usually do a light coat, followed by two wet coats (wet meaning you're spraying until you've reached a nice, continual gloss). The challenge in spraying is to do so in a nice, flowing, even manner. Applying too much, too quickly, and the clear will run. Watching the surface closely, or by practicing beforehand, you should easily be able to gain the proper feel you'll need.

The good thing about clearcoat, rather than a basic one stage paint, is the ability to repair it, so even if the spray is not perfect (and you get orange peel or light runs), you can wetsand and buff errors out.

Also, we're talking about painting a whale tail spoiler here, not a hood, a hatch, or a whole car. It's a relatively small item so it's a perfectly good size for a diy'er to learn on. I doubt you'll have too much trouble priming, painting, clearing it all. Good luck!
 
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