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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
found milk in the oil this afternoon. not good! it is obvious what the next step is, but my question is should i do it myself and save $500 in labor? i figure between me, the haynes manual, and my good friend we should be able to get it done. if there is any help or advice any of you can give me then don't hold back.

Thanks,

Ben Y.
 

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noxben said:
found milk in the oil this afternoon. not good! it is obvious what the next step is, but my question is should i do it myself and save $500 in labor? i figure between me, the haynes manual, and my good friend we should be able to get it done. if there is any help or advice any of you can give me then don't hold back.

Thanks,

Ben Y.
Know in your heart and mind that the gasket is shot, maybe the head bolts are loose, this is know to happen - but, chances are, its the head gasket.
Monitor the fluid levels on a religious basis, if the coolant level is dropping and there are no external leaks, then - break out the wallet.
Professional grade tools must be used, the torque wrench must be in calibration, air tools are damn nice to have.

Why did this happen, what can be done to prevent another occurrence - even ten years down the road ??

That new "Mercedes anti-freeze" is supposed to be wonderful. I have been running the old green anti-freeze and anti-rust additive for years with no problems (knock on aluminum !!).

The cylinder head must be checked for trueness - particularly if the car ever severely overheated.
Use new hoses as necessary, most from eEuroparts ($60), and the rest are inexpensive generic($15).
With the head off, it is a good time to check out the timing chain and balance shafts and , of course, the serpentine belt.
Maybe even do the complete tune up while you are at it, if due - or close.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i really didn't find milk in my oil. more like a milky residue. oops. i don't mind doing it myself. i have access to plenty of tools. just need a weekend to do it. as for the trueness of the head or block i have my dounts that it is true. i had the engine rebuilt 3 years ago and the head gasket is already shot. that doesn't seem right. would it be a good time to switch to the 2.3 head or cams? how much more difficult is that? again feel free to fill in the blanks here.

Ben Y.
 

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I would consider doing it yourself then if you have the tools. What you should do to prevent this in the future is buy a copper head gasket. No leaks in the future at all. Unless installed the wrong way but def the copper head gasket is the way to go. The head gasket can be acquired from www.paeco.com. Its going to be a little more expensive then your regular head gasket, but its worth it in the long run.
 

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so the oil itself didn't look milky? Just some milky crap on the dipstick?

I'd change the oil, tighten the head bolts, and run it for a couple of days. If the milkiness returns, you KNOW it's a head gasket and then you can have the supreme fun of taking it off. While it's off, get the mating face machined and the valves reground.....
 

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so the oil itself didn't look milky? Just some milky crap on the dipstick?

I'd change the oil, tighten the head bolts, and run it for a couple of days. If the milkiness returns, you KNOW it's a head gasket and then you can have the supreme fun of taking it off. While it's off, get the mating face machined and the valves reground.....
 

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mike saunders said:
so the oil itself didn't look milky? Just some milky crap on the dipstick?

I'd change the oil, tighten the head bolts, and run it for a couple of days. If the milkiness returns, you KNOW it's a head gasket and then you can have the supreme fun of taking it off. While it's off, get the mating face machined and the valves reground.....
No need to regrind valves - un;less you see smoke - same would go for the stem seals - but for $12 in parts - I'd atleast replace the stem seals over re-seating a head (unless you know it's bad or really high in mileage) - "mating" the head is a MUST do in my book - so at the least - seals and planeing it would surfice - IF you even hafta go that far. Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
so get the copper gasket. should it be .030" or .060"? i should replace the valve seals? don't mess with valves themselves. take the head to machining. block goes untouched?
i haven't drained the oil yet, just found some globs on the dip stick. i guess i will change oil and retighten bolts just to make sure before i go neck deep into this project.

Ben Y.
 

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i'd have the head planed no matter what - it's up to you on the rest - how many miles are on the engine? I've heard bad things about those copper head gaskets too - it's cheaper and just as good to use the OEM gasket for the head - use Eeuroparts.com to get the kit cheap. something like $53 for ALL the gaskets.
 

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I have head only good things about those. Some bad but they were due to bad installation. If you don't want to go with copper there are other alternatives to OEM and copper, just need to look into it. As for the size, I would go for a smaller size in the copper head gasket; the bigger size is for more serious racing applications, or higher boost. .

I had to change the head gasket on my car when I first got it. The same think was appearing on my dip stick. All nasty cream white milk substance, it was on the dipstick and also in my oil. At this time I had no clue about car so I brought it to a Saab tech to get it fixed.

Just make sure you do the correct installation of a copper head gasket to make sure it seals. I'm sure more info is on Google for this, I just posted a brief install.

Dan

when using a copper gasket, the cylinder block must be o-ringed to help the copper gasket seal. Cutting a groove around the sleeve and using a copper wire thickness of .039 is common place. Leave about .009 height of wire above the block surface.

*A Note Of Caution:
When using fiber head gaskets, put them on dry; no sealers or coatings. For copper head gaskets, a spraying of copper coat on both sides is sufficient. Allow it to dry and tack-up for 2 hours before installing. Make sure both the head and cylinder surfaces have been machined flat and are clean before installing the gaskets.
 

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Copper is a personal choice but i have used a copper gasket to help reduce compression on a motor when I did a custom turbo kit and it was a massive pain in the neck to have to groove and ring the cylinders (the pain was the cost and time). If you are going to build a race prepped or very high boost motor then you might as well plan on just doing the copper gasket and the whole bottom end. I personally don't think that copper will give you any more longevity on the gasket over the OE.

This is a personal choice though and you have to weigh out the options on cost and time to get everything done.
 
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