Saab Link Forums banner

21 - 40 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
355 Posts
Looks Good Nick... maybe you'll see me up at AIT this weekend. I need to cut the fender I think unless ted has a crazy way to fix it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
711 Posts
I did a similar job to this, but I used rivets and black caulk instead of welding. My hole though was a man-hole not these little things you guys have, hell I would have just put some duct-tape over that and called it a day :lol:

I had two holes, one huge one visible, one about the size of a regular man's foot on the d/s footwell :)

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/album157

The repairs mentioned in the thread though look nicer than mine :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
711 Posts
I need to get under the carpet and see what my floors look like.

The body on my car has rough spots, but looking under it I think the floor may be ok.
If you get underneath the car, you don't need to pull back the carpets, just start touching the floor to see if it is solid. Though it is usually a good idea as often the foam gets soaked in water and starts rusting the floor from the inside out, this was happening on mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I spent a little while trying to figure out how to draw the cut lines on the donor panel pictures, but I was completely unsuccessful :-(

Anyways, I think you can get the idea from the following 2 pictures. Here we see Mike grinding some welds on the driver's side. The driver's side floor pan has been welded in place. Remember to drill a few holes in the pan (between the old spot welds) so you can weld the new pan to the existing frame rail.
There is a seam running down the right side of the exhaust channel. Along the door sill, the bottom section of the unibody (including the jacking pad) has been welded in right after the pan.


Now in this picture we see all the metal in place. Welds have been ground down a little. Panels have been primed. And a 3M seam sealant has been applied over the welds.



I am still driving it around this way so that I can appreciate the time, effort, patience and skills that went into making this possible.
Thanks Ted and Mike for all your help! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
I'm in the process of doing the exact same thing as you did, well not as elaborate (less rust). Just wanting to know how you covered up the fuel lines to avoid weld splatter from setting the car ablaze? Did you braze weld it? or mig?

Also if someone can explain why the bracing is so important. I can't see how the chassis will warp in such a way that the doors won't sit right, it has rocker panels, door frames, and cross members along the floor to keep it pretty well in place. Am I missing something here?

Thanks
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
7,595 Posts
The fuel lines you should probably discharge by pulling the fuel pump fuse, and then running the car till it stops. There will still be fuel in them, but IF a spark happened to get through the plastic it would not SPRAY fuel everywhere... After Discharging the fuel, wrap the lines up with a clean damp towel and set them up out of the way. You should do the same with any exposed wiring, and be especially careful when cutting the old material out as it's very easy to nick the harness and cut some wires.


Bracing is important in a C-900 when disconnecting the structural members. Jack the car up at one corner and then try to open and close the doors. You will see. If you tried to repair the floors including the structural member without paying attention to door alignments, you will find once the repair is done, the doors will no longer open and close properly.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
7,595 Posts
Oh, and when welding in general you should always have a bucket of water or garden hose AND a dry chemical fire extinguisher handy - just in case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
I was thinking of running the car on empty, pulling out the pump to empty out the lines, disconnecting them entirely, rolling them up and then put a wet towel/rag around them, but your way seems way easier. Fire extinguisher is always next to me when I weld, will be even closer since I'll be so close to gasoline lines. Good advice.

As for the car distorting, I see where you're coming from. I'll have the car just sitting normally, not jacked up, so there should be no worries once welded. Was thinking that the bracing was needed due to heat distortion when welding.

Thanks again
Adam
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Well... We ended up setting the donor car on fire because we didn't fully cover the fuel lines. Oops. But when working on the project car we used a large piece of leather. Something like 2ft by 6ft to wrap the fuel lines.

Bracing was required on this project because we were cutting out a large portion of the rockers. If you are doing a 5sq inch patch around the drain plugs, I bet it isn't necessary to brace.

Good luck, send pictures and do you best to get the undercoating off before you start using your torch.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
7,595 Posts
Bracing was required on this project because we were cutting out a large portion of the rockers. If you are doing a 5sq inch patch around the drain plugs, I bet it isn't necessary to brace.
Yes, this is correct. Only needed if you are getting into the rockers / frame connecting rails. Sheet metal repair needs no bracing what so ever, even a pretty significant amount of it, just cut out and replace. Remember to coat both sides with your preferred rust treatment and top coat with tar / undercoat material.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
Great tips guys, and anyone planning on doing this should not try to cut any corners either. A little prevention will make for a successful job on those panels without having to call the fire dept. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,049 Posts
Looks great - wish I knew welders like this back when i was in school -I may have still had my 87' 9000 if I had. Keep updating us on progress of the build/repairs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
After almost finishing the passenger side floor, I can now say that I have the utmost respect for the job you did in this thread. It's an absolute dreaded thing to do, I hate it...:mad: but once done it gives you a good feeling of accomplishment. Still got the driver's side to go, dammit. I followed all the tips you guys mentioned and used a bit of creativity on an additional cross beam, a welding anti-splatter enclosure and some unorthodox cleaning methods..:)

Can you tell that I'm not a welder by trade? Some pics.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor1.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor2.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor3.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor4.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor5.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor6.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor7.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor8.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor9.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor10.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor11.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor12.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor13.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor14.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor15.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff308/adshaft/Floor16.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
Discussion Starter · #39 ·
At which point did you use Easy-Off oven cleaner? I like the creativity! Keep on going, we're all watching ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
After 2hrs of baking @ 2000° haha, actually just after I grinded and wire brushed the finished work. Then I used the POR15 Metal-Prep. That metal prep stuff is great to work on metal and a must on any rusted areas. All you do is grind the rust till you hit good metal and then spray it, let it work and rinse away. It neutralizes the rust and gives a great base to finish off with primer and top-coat, or even better with POR15's rust prevent paint.
 
21 - 40 of 48 Posts
Top