Saab Link Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I used permatex ultra gray silicone to seal engine to tranmission, seals fine, no leaks. I used ultra gray silicone on the whole engine and tramission exept head gasket and valve cover gasket, just aply thin coat. Works great, if I have known this 10 years ago I could of saved lots of money.

I just see saabsite lists some silicone for the same gasket, that metal gasket costs more than $20 now and it does not seal well
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
I prefer the brown chocolate looking permatex. comes in a small metal tube. cant remember what its called.it never completely dries.silicone on the other hand i avoid.i don't like the way it oozes out the sides of the mating surfaces.the chocolate stuff doesn't do that.
working on a used car lot,i dont know how many hondas and the like i would see with this orange crap oozing out of every crack in the engine.a horrible thing to see.that was a good indication that this car was going to give me a hard time. Oh the perils of the used car lot mechanic !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,384 Posts
I always use the metal gasket and I spray both sides with Permatex 80064 anaerobic gasket spray to be sure it doesn't leak. I also use Permatex 518 anaerobic sealant in the areas that Bentley says to use the blue gasket goop. I'm not a big fan of the possibility of chunks of dried sealant clogging up oil passages. If sealant between the engine and trans dries and flakes off, it ends up right in the oil sump. Just because the engine/trans doesn't show signs of leaking when using sealant caulk, it doesn't mean that you aren't creating other issues by using it--my 2 ¢
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,049 Posts
^ Agree with turbocon86

I personally use Anaerobic Sealer on just about everything - thin bead or layer. Like said above - it stays "loose" because it only seals with the absence of oxygen. I've used the stuff since working at the dealer and I will continue to until I find something better. It's a little pricy - but 1 tube will do an entire engine and then some easily. Worth the money IMHO.

I hate Ultra Gray/Black unless I am doing something non-engine related. A dab here and there for the intake gasket to hold it in place is about the only thing I'll use it for. But the spray tack stuff would work just as good if not better if that was on hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,950 Posts
I have to side with TurboCon and BurnsSide here....use the proper gaskets and sealants. I don't doubt that other methods, like Raul mentioned, will work fine, but why take a risk when you're doing time and labor intensive work? Do it correct the first time and forget about it for a long time, OR save a few bucks and take unnecessary risks. I vote for the the spend extra, don't worry, option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Most new japanese cars use "gray silicone" for oil pan to engine mating. You use light coat and you won't have problems. Ultra gray silicone when dries is like hard rubber and it is oil resistant.
 

·
c900 Grognard
Joined
·
3,713 Posts
I thought SAAB put out a service bulletin saying to just use anaerobic sealant rather than the gasket? Could be remembering wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,643 Posts
I thought SAAB put out a service bulletin saying to just use anaerobic sealant rather than the gasket? Could be remembering wrong.
No your right they did. I'm an arerobic Guy but some people want to fill there sump with Rtv chunks, So let them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,686 Posts
You use light coat and you won't have problems. Ultra gray silicone when dries is like hard rubber and it is oil resistant.
The light coat is key because you are correct, the shit dries to rubber and is oil resistant. Something that if/when it squeezes out will really fuck things up for you.





I avoid the shit because of my experiences (see above). Given, whoever used it on that did not use a thin smear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,022 Posts
We buy 518 by the case at my shop, specifically to avoid that ^^^ happening. Using too much 518 isn't gonna hurt anything too bad, it's just expensive.

Drew
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ultra gray silicone will not fall off like that and plug up oil screen. People use wrong silicone, they use thermostat housing silicone on oil pans thats when you get silicone in the oil screen.

You have to use silicone even on the stock metal gasket, service manual calls for silicone on the ends and on the bolts that go trough the tranmission. Before the metal gasket they had paper gasket and it leaked all the time. Now I use ultra gray silicone and no gasket at all and it works great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
you are correct Raul.i have used the gray stuff before[sisters mini ] and it is some what better then the black or orange stuff,blands in with the alminium..how thick is that metal gasket anyway ?will the engine sit lower then it should without it ?the stuff i use is permatex #2A.i am rebuilding a v4 trans and will try that anaerobic stuff.What the hell is the definition of "anaerobic" anyway ? have to look it up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,686 Posts
Anaerobic means without air. Essentially it indicates that is will only set in the absence of oxygen. So, it sets up in the spaces between the two pieces that are being joined, but none of the squeeze-out will set, so it will essentially be washed away by the oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
I thought SAAB put out a service bulletin saying to just use anaerobic sealant rather than the gasket? Could be remembering wrong.
Service bulletin (10/92-0265) specifies 510 for "[c]900, 9000 transmission sealing," not 518. But, to confuse things, it also states that "Permatex Ultra Blue, RTV Silicone Gasket" can be used for "[c]900 Engine transmission flange, B234 oil sump." I interpret this to mean that the 510 replaces paper transmission-only gaskets, and the Ultra Blue replaces the metal one. At the time, presumably, the c900 paper engine gaskets were still used; therefore, the bulletin specifies 518 only for 9000 engine sealing. Maybe someone has a more recent bulletin that differs.

510 cures rigid, whereas 518 is flexible. 510 is also rated to 400*F; 518 is rated to 300*F. Whether this actually matters for a c900 engine/gearbox mating, I don't know.

Personally, I'm happy to keep using the $15 steel gaskets (w/518 in the grooves) because it's likely faster, neater (anyone ever brought a block down and struggled a bit to get the alignment dowels figured out?), is risk-free with regard to pick-up fouling, none of the engines I've mated using them leak, and my favorite local c900 transmission rebuilder continues to use them.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top