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HNNLIC
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my friends has a C900 S in his lot not being used. The tranny is shot (1st and Reverse don't work), so we decided to turn it into a Rally car. So far we only have the interior gutted, and next we're going to install a roll cage.

I may be asking both Burns, and Delorean for some input as to some things that may need to upgraded.

I'll takes pics whenever I can get the digi cam back.

Also Rich, I may be calling upon you regarding this reinforced rebuilt tranny i've been hearing so much about.
 

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Skid plates - get the updated extra thick one!!! You can take serious jumps and cause no damage to the trans or motor with it :p
What year c900??
If you plan to rally it - remove all the glass and get plexi-glass or some sorta non-glass windows....
 

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well just to let you know and not to discourage you or anything, it will take alot of money just to get that thing up to being competitve. That said, i wish you luck and hope all goes well. Tranny is definitely going to need to be upgraded, you could try and do it yourself if you want, ive heard its not that hard. and if you want some inspriation check out James Fox's site: http://www.saabworks.com i spoke to him at carlisle and he is really into it and really seems to know his stuff, has lots of great ideas about rallying a saab. I also noticed that hes very willing to share his knowledge with anyone thats interested, i suggest you send him an email and ask him.

Paul
 

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it will take alot of money just to get that thing up to being competitve.
It'll take a lot of money just to get it legal! Unless you're just planning on rally cross, which you can basically use any car in. Here's a link to the SCCA's club rally page:

http://www.scca.org/Rally/ClubRally.asp?IdS=005BF0-A3C6950&x=040|030&~=

Get some sponsors. I bet costs to prep a car and participate in a season approach $10g's.

Keep us posted no matter what though!
 

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driver found said:
Get some sponsors. I bet costs to prep a car and participate in a season approach $10g's.
yeah exactly what James said when i asked about the cost of rallying a while ago, at least 10k :roll: . Too much for me.

Paul
 

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HNNLIC
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yea if I make this into a joint project w/ some companies and maybe even a school club, there may be some sponsorship going on.
 

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At worst, you could make it a good rally cross car. That would probably be only a few grand (suspension, wheels, tires), though it's not as glamorous I suppose.
 

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HNNLIC
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Whats the difference?
 

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rallycross is like autocross but on dirt, short tracks and they focus on very little prep work, they want everyone to come out and have fun in the dirt rather than break their cars and hurt themselves like can happen in real stage rallys.

Thats what i hear anyway, cause theres none that happen around me :roll: .

Paul
 

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HNNLIC
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thats probably what we're going to do.
 

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I personally think building a rally car or a race car is a great idea, the classic 900 body style is slowly loosing it’s status not because it’s a bad car but more because in order to get good sponsors they look for “new” looking body styles which after being around a lot of SCCA cars Saab just doesn’t have the suspension design to be competitive. This doesn’t mean a classic 900 can’t compete just means the higher end sponsors are looking for flashy new styles in order to advertise their products.
This means that racing a classic limits you to sponsors that cater to the classic Saab, places like (only an example) Group9, Redline MTL or someplace that maybe specializes in older Saab restoration. Those would be the sponsors to contact…. With the two Saab cars I am affiliated with, James Fox was one, Ron Wilcox’s ITB 900 was the other these guys did the best they could with the help of friends who pitched in or in my case I did James’s body over as a way of sponsoring his car…. Doesn’t always have to be money to be a sponsor, parts, discounts and free service all could be considered “sponsorship”
The classic 900 is a great starting point for entry level racing, but you must have your goals and classification in which your racing pretty much decided before you begin. With SCCA there are some major rules to what you can and can not do to your car and you need to be aware of these rule prior to building the car because you could find yourself put into a much higher classification then you really wanted to start in… One thing (after reading a few posts) is you can not remove the factory glass in most beginner classes… you can however remove the drivers window glass but plexi replacement is not allowed unless your racing in a more competitive class… for an example, if you remove your glass and opt for a lighter set-up you no longer can race in street stock classes, this means in order to stay competitive you now need to spend more money on other parts or why bother racing at all…. I mean the goal with racing is winning right? And if you racing with faster lighter cars you need to be faster and lighter yourself and everything you do to your car requires time and money…
I suggest joining the SCCA and getting a rule book before you even begin installing the roll cage or you may find yourself cutting it back out because you failed tech inspection….
OK back to the good points of the 900
Replacement bodies are inexpensive and easy to find.
Parts are generally inexpensive.
The classics still use fairly simple electronics which are easy to repair or troubleshoot.
The suspension is pretty rugged and can be set-up without major altering.
The Saab 16V NA motor is a torquey motor and can handle just about anything.
The classic 900 body is very well built and won’t “stress” like other cars (ever seen the stress cracks in say a Honda after a season of racing?)
The down fall?
In stock or close to stock classes you can not modify a whole bunch, you can’t stray away from………. Stock… you can not run a turbo in fact I do not even think there is a turbo class in SCCA anymore unless you run in the classic street or antique classes, both of which are more for hobbies then anything.
You can't modify the engine a whole lot, you can’t change to much in the way of fuel systems (fuel cell and braided fuel lines… maybe a fuel pump) but that’s about it.
In dirt or off road rally skid plates are a must, in road courses or on the track it’s a waste of time and added weight… all things must be considered before you begin.
There are tons of different classes, it’s up to you and what you want to experience and of course how much money you want to invest. I’ve seen the $15,000 beginner’s cars to the home town guy with a family who’s managed to stay competitive with a $5,000 dollar car…..
Personally I think the “dirt guys” are just freakin crazy…. I am a track kinda guy and hope to campaign my own car in 2006 which will be a 16V classic 900.
Don’t forget you need a license too…. Driver’s schools start at around $3000 to $9000. I started by joining the SCCA, then became a corner worker to learn the ins and outs… then got my novice license… I still need school but it’s better to go knowing a little then to go thinking you know everything but in reality you know nothing at all…..
 

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What Rhich said...

Racing is definitely not cheap, no matter how many people dream it is. However, if you have $10k to blow, anything is possible. To race in SCCA, you have to get a license, which is quite the venture in itself. And if you've never driven on a track, good luck with that. Rally is a little easier, but is probably the most expensive form of racing -- talk about maintenence!! I've watched so many people go gung-ho into a season, and destroy there car qualifying for the first race.

Remember, if you can't imagine yourself writing it off, don't do it. Same goes for track driving -- when you watch the guy with a brand new M3 crying next to the car he just put into the tire barrier, you'll know what I mean. I bought my Saab just so I wouldn't be crying when my 2002 GTI has an off. $650 is easier to deal with then $20k.

That said, sounds like fun! I want to try my hand at rally cross with my new acquisition. One story though...a recent event was shut down because the first 3 people (who had no autocross or track exp. let alone rally) rolled there cars (one being a WRX.) Thought they were T. Makinen or something :roll:
 
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