2000 9-3 CV Front Brakes - The Saab Link Forums

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Performance Modifications for the NG900 / Old 9-3 This forum contains PERFORMANCE related Q&A's for the NG900 and 9-3. This may also include suspension.

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Old 08-02-2018, 04:57 AM   #1
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2000 9-3 CV Front Brakes

Rears done with the Aero 300 rotors, calipers, Taliaferro lines. Work like a champ. Slight modification to the backing plates, flip the bracket over that holds the parking brake return spring, very easy swap.
Now, for the front.
Running 16" wheels off of my 2011.
I ordered N141729 brackets from NAPA. They will fit over the 308mm rotor. With a little modification, they will fit over the 314.
I will fit the 93.176.357 caliper before I try to modify the brackets, If it all fits under the 16" wheel, I'll go that route. It fits on my 2011.
I am going to modify a couple 13.276.089 backing plates from a 2011 9-3. I used them on my 2011 when I installed the 314's.

Unless someone has a better idea for backing plates.

Anyone have any experience with 314's on an old 9-3?
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Old 08-02-2018, 05:46 AM   #2
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The knuckles are different. I don't believe the caliper brackets bolt up to an OG9-3.
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Old 08-02-2018, 07:03 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by srp View Post
The knuckles are different. I don't believe the caliper brackets bolt up to an OG9-3.
They do. I have a whole box of bits from several generations of brake upgrades on several 03> brake upgrades. The 314 rotors fit fine using the 308 bracket (with a little massaging), the 314 pads, the original 285 caliper. All under a 2011 14 spoke 16" wheel. I need a backing plate solution. I would also like to try the 314 calipers. If nobody knows, then I will take one off of my 2011 and try it before I order a set.
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Old 08-02-2018, 07:25 AM   #4
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Ah, missed the part about using the 308 caliper bracket and caliper.

What are you looking to accomplish by keeping the same caliper but a larger rotor? That will really only add weight and the ability to disapate more heat. You're not upgrading to a larger caliper, so the clamping force doesn't change, and you're not moving the caliper further out, so you're not gaining leverage.

Are the 314 calipers dual piston or are they a single piston design?
If single piston, is that piston larger then the 308/285 piston?

When I upgraded to 308mm brakes in my 900, my backing plates were toast, so I just run without them. Never had a problem.
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Old 08-07-2018, 04:25 AM   #5
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When it's all said and done, I ended up with 314 rotors, 314 pads, the 308 brackets and the original 57mm 185 calipers. The brackets required a bit of filing, nothing structural. I would not recommend this procedure to any car that will be going out in the weather, as there is no clearance for the inevitable rust that will arrive. It took far more time to rework the large 2002- on backing plates than anything else. The center bore needed to be about 3mm larger, and the three attachment holes drilled in them. After that, though, it all came together fine.
The machine shop is making up a plate to mount the larger bolt pattern caliper to the old 93 strut. If it works out, I will try the 314 calipers off of the new 93. The only difference is aluminum vs steel and a 60mm piston vs 57. They work great on my 2011.
This all fits under the 16" 2011 wheels, and there is still a little room for the wheel weights to pass by.
I picked up a little more pad area and a larger rotor for better cooling. Same with the back. Any brakes will stop once. Down a hill with a trailer, though, I need to get rid of some heat.
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Old 08-07-2018, 07:22 AM   #6
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I'm having some trouble following everything here, do you have any pictures of the setup? That would help tremendously.
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Old 08-08-2018, 03:55 PM   #7
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Hi, I can't see the point of this alteration which your insurance company or someone else's may not see as an "upgrade'. This is not, say a Bilstein kit designed by a professional suspension engineer, or one designed with vast experience and 'all the gear' for example AJ Heasman's at Sydenham NSW who design and fit suspension mod's for example as required by Police and Ambulance authorities. This is an amateur researching and experimenting likely without having the alterations scrutinised by an engineering expert and a plate fitted to the vehicle or examined and denied. If the vehicle is examined by a mechanic for say registration and passed in the altered condition together you have placed him in a position of liability as well as yourself. "but...it passed rego....." will not wash you out of liability.

Braking involves the response of suspension components and tyres as well as body 'flex', though flex is likely consistent throughout each series. That is one reason that seriously damaged SAAB 9000's (for example) should not be repaired. All vehicles are expected to be maintained within design parameters.

Automobile designers are not only concerned with performance to a particular end, reliability, fuel consumption and pollution but in safety. They design their vehicles to have the components work in unison and predictably, at least to standards and design criteria of the organisation. Irrespective of what you feel you are achieving and 'why', you are making major changes to a vehicle in which far 'lesser' changes can undermine insurance and render a car less safe....wide tyres and wheels (>1inch) are an example of both. Putting better tyres on the front, another example. Being dismissive about insurance conditions lasts as long as an accident in which vehicle examination on behalf of an insurer, police, a person acting on a tort or more serious issue examines the vehicle.

I'd ask "Will you take it to a Certifying Engineer and have it checked-out, and report to us on the outcome in short order"..In the very unlikely event yours is eventually "passed' and was mod. plated ; ....the problem I see then arising is others may think your 'pass' is permission for them to follow you and presume theirs' passed'. That's what is called 'sub-optimal thinking'.

A story ...when young I modified many cars including straight-8 Buicks of the 30's and 40's, through to Alfa and Fiat.in a very balanced and properly engineeringly designed fashion....A chap I knew, possibly still alive, turned one or two lesser Buicks into the longer-chassied Buick Centuries...using coat-hangers as welding rods. Utterly irresponsible...but he thought it was very clever.

One chap, this one competent, went further and built an entire vehicle, including its chassis and panels....it was a work of engineering art.

The chap, Rob Roue,trade teacher at TAFE and Mechanic, worked with Bugatti and other 'exotica'. Rob built himself a Lotus Super seven...amazing job...and took it to Nth Sydney Rego Office....which was lost to the freeway construction. The Inspector eventually got around to him and said ' I'm not bXXXXy passing this mate'....why not?...it's held together with bxxxxy rivets!"....Seen any jet airliners lately?......Silence....then he passed it after the rest of the due diligence.

I've 'been there' and I have also been an insurance investigator. Like it or not there are rules, for a reason concerning motor vehicles. My suggestion, just because you can do it may be clever and adept but before you start, go the right way. Enquire of a Compliance qualified motor engineer.

Last edited by Pythagorus; 08-08-2018 at 04:08 PM. Reason: a couple of spelling and syntax errors
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Old 08-09-2018, 06:44 AM   #8
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Wow, you sure have a lot of time on your hands. I apologize, I really didn't read your whole reply.
All parts are factory parts, made by Saab AG. (With the exception of the brake pads, which were made in Michigan by a Japanese company.) Liability? Are you going to rear end me and blame it on my brakes? It's not like I stuck a bolt in the waste gate and doubled the HP. I made the heat dissipation better to tow a trailer.
And, it works. Well.
FTR, this "Modification," "Upgrade," whatever you want to call it, will pass muster with any sanctioning body on the planet. Bring it on. The only evidence of anything other than factory are the blue rear brake hoses.

Last edited by frickjp; 08-09-2018 at 07:07 AM.
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Old 08-10-2018, 07:08 AM   #9
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The insurance company or state inspection wouldn't say a thing unless it was sensationally stupidly modified way beyond stock. For example a Honda Civic with god knows how much negative camber it has with tires that do not even fit the rims correctly. Even then you see this crap rolling down the road with a current inspection sticker which also means they usually have insurance in order to pass inspection.
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