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Old 10-02-2019, 06:28 AM   #1
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9-5 Rear Suspension Bushing Replacement

When searching for information about replacing the bushings for the rear control arms, I wasn't able to find a bunch of information. I thought I'd outline the work I've done on 2 different 9-5 Wagons.

There are 5 bushings on each side with a total of 10. I would recommend doing them all if you're going through the trouble to do any one of them.

Image of the bushings (Only need 2 of the long / narrow ones if you're doing adjustable arms)



There's the trailing arm bushing's towards the front of the car and 2 rose bushings upper and lower on the outer knuckle as well as 2 control arm bushings on the upper and lower control arms where they bolt to the rear subframe.

eEuroparts has a good blog post outlining the reasons for replacement. Here's a link to the post:

https://www.eeuroparts.com/blog/7473...ension-issues/

Image borrowed from eEuroparts to diagram bushings:





OEM Part Numbers for the Bushings:


Outer bushings: 4567244

Inner bushings: 4566378

Trailing arm bushings: 12781136 (I highly recommend the Powerflex trailing arm bushings for the price)

To Start:

- Remove the wheel and expose the rear trailing arm.
- Remove the 3 18mm bolts that hold the trailing arm to the front of the rear
wheel well
- Remove the 21 mm shock bolt
- Remove the 2 18mm bolts that hold the control arms to the trailing arm
- Remove the emergency brake cable from the brake mechanism
- Remove the 10 mm bolt that holds the emergency brake cable bracket to
the trailing arm
- Remove the 16 mm bolt that holds the sway bar link to the trailing arm


At this point, you can drop the trailing arm to the ground and have better access to the 15mm (maybe 16mm?) nuts / studs that hold the rear hubs to the trailing arm. There are 6 nuts that you need to remove here. There are 2 that hold the bracket that holds the brake line and wheel speed sensor to the back of the hub, then there are 4 that actually hold the hub to the trailing arm. However, the 2 that hold the bracket on are the on the same stud as the ones that hold the hub to the car. Be sure to remove the connector for the wheel speed sensor to the hub before you drop everything so the wiring does not get damaged.

I make this point because I got super confused swapping a hub bearing awhile back not realizing it was laid out this way.



Now to replace the bushings:


Trailing Arm Bushings:

To get the trailing arm bushing out, I used a 1.5" hole saw to drill out the center and then a reciprocating saw to carefully cut the metal race out. If you have a press, you could also pop it out super easily.

To install the Powerflex bushing, just apply the supplied grease and slip it in. Install the center metal sleeve.

Trailing Arm Rose Bushings:


I have done this 2 different ways now. The first time, I used a press on everything. A press is great for every bushing except for the lower trailing arm rose bushing. The angle on the arm that is made to accommodate the rear shock bolt makes it extremely difficult to fit any type of receiver in there. The press also has to be able to fit the length of the trailing arm inside which I found to be difficult. I ended up paying a shop to do this one bushing the first time. The second time, I purchased a specialty tool. I highly recommend using a tool that has the proper sized pieces to push and receive the bushing. I found a lot of options overseas.

Here's a picture of the tool I used. I got it from the UK for $50 USD shipped:



It's a great tool, but the supplied threaded parts stripped despite my best efforts with grease and heating up the bushings. I used some random Saab bolts I had laying around and they worked better. You will need a threaded rod / nut combination to do the lower bushings on both sides due to the clearance issues. You cannot fit a bolt through.

Link: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Opel-Vectra...72.m2749.l2649

If you have a press / receiver kit, here is the measurement of roughly the OD you would need to push the bushing through



Use the tool or press to get the rose bushings out:





Some heat applied to the trailing arm will help get the bushing out easier. Ideally you'd heat it up before you put the tool on to avoid expanding the tool as well. I also used PB blaster a few days prior to loosen up corrosion, but I don't know how much that actually helped.



To press in the new bushings, I'd recommend putting them in the freezer a couple of days in advance to contract them. I also heated up the trailing arm prior to installation to expand it to make installation easier. Use the tool in the reverse way to push the bushing in. Also use some kind of grease on the bushing.



Repeat on for upper and lower on both sides.

Finished product:






Upper and Lower Control Arms:

The inner bushings on the control arms are much easier to work with than the outer rose bushings. If you have a press, definitely use it to make short work of these bushings. Make sure to use a block or something to maintain the shape of the control arm as you press a new bushing in. The part that houses the bushing is very thin and can bend easily. I still need to do these bushings on my second wagon and don't intend on using a press. I will update how I end up getting it done.



If you want to have adjustment of the camber in the rear, you have the option of installing adjustable rear control arms on the lower mount. I installed them on the first wagon I did. I love them, but I haven't figured out an effective solution for the rear headlight leveling sensor that mounts there yet. If you install these, you only have to replace 1 set of upper control arm bushings as the new adjustable arms will come with new bushings installed.




There are many brands of the adjustable lower control arms. I went with Moog. PN:




Install the trailing arm in the reverse order you took it out and torque to specifications. Reinstall the trailing arm bushing bracket and torque the bolt before you install the arm back on the car. You can't torque it once it's installed. Torque spec is 90 Nm + 60 degrees





Additional Rear Suspension Torque specs per the WIS:






Rear Hub Assembly Instructions/ Torque Specs:




Other Job Notes:



** The second time I did this job, I used trailing arms from a junkyard car because I wanted to have them ready to install and I wanted to have trailing arms that weren't rusty. This obviously isn't necessary, but will help divide the work up.

**Instead of removing the wheel hub, you could alternatively just remove the brake caliper. However, consider that there may be shims that were previously installed between the hub and trailing arm to account for negative camber. If you're installing adjustable arms, you're going to want to remove these shims. Or even if you're not, I'd prefer to remove them, check alignment, and go from there.

**There are many ways to disassemble the suspension to do this job. If you want to have alot of room to work and do everything at once, you can drop the entire rear subframe. I did it this way my first time. The second time I did the control arm bushings separately from the rose bushings, so I just took the arm off.

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Old 10-02-2019, 07:47 AM   #2
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This is excellent, I'm glad you put it all in one spot. It'll be nice and easy for me to reference when I finally decide to replace this stuff on my wagon.

Would you say it did anything to help with the "saggy" look that 9-5 wagons usually have in the back?
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Old 10-02-2019, 08:45 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 9Kwrecker View Post
This is excellent, I'm glad you put it all in one spot. It'll be nice and easy for me to reference when I finally decide to replace this stuff on my wagon.
Heck yeah. That's the goal. Gotta keep the technical stuff alive as Saab mechanics wear thin. Power to the DIY'er.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 9Kwrecker View Post
Would you say it did anything to help with the "saggy" look that 9-5 wagons usually have in the back?
In my opinion, yes. It definitely helps. Especially if you do the adjustable arms. The arms take out any negative camber, regardless of the cause, and makes the wheel straight in the wheel well.

I will say that the outer bushings are designed really well. Of the ones I've taken out, they've only been slightly clickly when trying to rock them back and forth.I'm not sure that these ones contribute a bunch to the sag, but I imagine that even a little bit of wear on these will cause some degree of negative camber.
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Old 10-02-2019, 08:51 AM   #4
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Old 10-02-2019, 09:09 AM   #5
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So no adjustment to the coils in those pics, only difference is the bushings?

That is the one that you put the coils in right? So hard keeping your simultaneous wagon builds straight lol.
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Old 10-02-2019, 09:15 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 9Kwrecker View Post
So no adjustment to the coils in those pics, only difference is the bushings?

That is the one that you put the coils in right? So hard keeping your simultaneous wagon builds straight lol.
Yes, the only difference is the bushings / adjustable arms. Both of those pictures are old and are with the stock Aero springs and Bilstein B8's that are now on the Glacier Blue wagon. The after picture is the day I finished up the work on the rear suspension bushings.

Yeah I can't keep them straight myself sometimes. I'm basically redo-ing everything on the blue wagon that I just did on the brown wagon last year. Water pump and silicone hoses are next.
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Old 10-02-2019, 01:48 PM   #7
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Very nice work!
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Old 10-09-2019, 08:11 PM   #8
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Awesome write up. Thanks for taking the time to put it together!
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