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Old 01-12-2012, 09:17 AM   #1
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Aero Transmision Fluid / Transfer case fluid AWD

Ive called the Remaining Dealers still open around me in a 2 hour radius they don't have any nor plan to carry any..

Are there any alternatives to these oils

Thank You,
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Old 01-12-2012, 09:52 AM   #2
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Did you call Anders at Swedecar? He usually had a good stock of the factory lubricants.


EDIT: Did some legwork for you.

You're going to hate this - there are 3 different oils specified for the all-wheel drive system, in addition to the oil for the 6-speed automatic.

*******************

Transmission:

This applies to ALL 6-speed AF-40 automatic transmissions fitted to 9-3 Aero's, Turbo-X's, and 9-3X's fitted with B284 2.8L V-6 engines.



AF-40 6-speed transmission - SAAB Part number for the fluid is 93 165 147

GM calls this model # AF-40, but it's internally designated by Aisin-Warner as TF-80SC. There are LOTS of cars that use this transmission, so as long as the fluid meets the Aisin-Warner 'AW-1' spec, then it should be fine to use.

Follow --> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AWTF-80_SC



Quote:
Originally Posted by SAAB

Weight, torque, fluid capacity and grade of fluid - Automatic Transmission



Transmission, including fluid kg 96
Maximum torque capacity Nm 450
Oil volume (total incl. torque converter at 75°C) Z19, B207 l 7.0
Oil volume (total incl. torque converter at 75°C) for B284 l 6.7
Oil volume (for oil change) Z19, B207 l 2.85
Oil volume (for oil change) for B284 l 2.55
Grade of fluid (B284 AF-40 6-speed automatic ONLY) 93 165 147 Automatic transmission fluid, mineral oil based. Synthetic oil has a coefficient of friction that differs from mineral oil based oil and should therefore not be used. The use of synthetic oil can cause malfunction through abnormal wear.



*****************

XWD System:

WIS has almost no information about the actual hardware used in the XWD setup.

There are three different oils specified for the three components of XWD - the transfer case (splits output torque between front diff and driveshaft to rear diff), the differential clutch (takes the place of the center diff in Audi or Subaru layouts, the level of slip of this clutch determines how much torque goes to rear diff vs. to front diff - it's a wet clutch, like a motorcycle), and the rear limited slip differential itself, which I do know is made by Haldex, but no info on mechanism type or model number.



Fluids:


Quote:
Originally Posted by SAAB
Fluid type and capacity



Transfer case

Capacity: 0.66 l

Part no. 93 165 383 (1-litre package)




Differential clutch

Capacity, dry differential clutch: 0.52 l (without limited slip differential clutch) 0.56 l (with limited slip differential clutch)

Part no. 93 165 387 (1-litre package)




Limited Slip Differential

Capacity: 0.6 l (without limited slip differential clutch) 0.7 l (with limited slip differential clutch)

Part no. 93 165 388 (1-litre package)





Description:

Quote:
Originally Posted by SAAB

Introduction

XWD is an active system for all-wheel drive which has been developed to optimise the vehicle's responsiveness and stability in all driving conditions. It optimises the transfer of drive torque between front and rear wheels according to the requirements of the circumstances, providing the driver with improved control.

It is controlled by its own electronic control module which works together with the ECM, TCM and ABS/ESP control modules. For the driver, this means maximum traction and strong, even acceleration with unnoticeable shifting of the drive torque between the wheels.

The chassis has been tuned with extreme precision and the XWD and ESP have been integrated with the focus on delivering optimum roadholding and performance.




General

A transfer case is bolted to the vehicle's normal gearbox and this transfers the power to the differential clutch via the propeller shaft.

The function of the differential clutch is to control the torque to the rear wheels and it is bolted to the limited slip differential.





Transfer case


The transfer case, also named PTU, is located to the right of the gearbox, to which it is bolted. Its primary function is to take power from the gearbox and transfer it via a hypoid gear to the differential clutch via the propeller shaft. The intermediate shaft runs to the right-hand front wheel through the transfer case.

During manufacture the transfer case is filled with oil, which then does not require changing. The correct type of oil must be used without exception when filling. The incorrect type of oil may destroy the transfer case.

The transfer case is fully mechanical.




Propeller shaft

The function of the propeller shaft is to transfer power from the transfer case to the differential clutch. It consists of three pipe sections, a front Rzeppa joint, two Polhem joints in the centre and a rear Rzeppa joint.

The propeller shaft's support bearings are fitted by the Polhem joints. The bearings are mounted in rubber bushings which are fitted in brackets, and these in turn are bolted to the underside of the vehicle. The position of the brackets is very precisely measured during vehicle manufacture. The propeller shaft does not run in a straight line between the transfer case and the differential clutch but is instead gently curved, and this is to avoid vibration.

The position of the brackets must be marked very precisely when replacing the propeller shaft.





Differential clutch

The differential clutch, also named TTD, is located in front of the limited slip differential, to which it is bolted. The propeller shaft connects at the front edge to the differential clutch, and then at the rear edge directly to the limited slip differential's pinion via a shaft equipped with splines. The XWD control module is fitted on the housing.

The primary function of the differential clutch is to control the degree of drive (torque) to the rear wheels. It can be varied between 0-100% drive, which takes place by means of a hydraulically controlled multi-disc clutch. The hydraulic pressure is built up by an electrically driven pump, and is controlled by the XWD control module via a solenoid valve.
Limited slip differential

The limited slip differential, also named RDM, is located in the subframe and the drive shafts extend from it to each respective rear wheel. The final drive gear consists of a hypoid gear and a differential. The differential clutch is bolted to the limited slip differential with 4 bolts. The splines-equipped pinion shaft for the final drive gear is directly inserted into the disc cage for the differential clutch.

During manufacture the limited slip differential is filled with oil, which then does not require changing. The correct type of oil must be used without exception when filling. The incorrect type of oil may destroy the limited slip differential.

The limited slip differential is fully mechanical.





Limited slip differential clutch

The limited slip differential clutch, also named eLSD, is bolted with 6 bolts to the left-hand side of the limited slip differential. Its relative position is governed by two guide pins and a flange on the final drive gear. Its function is to fully or partly lock the left-hand drive shaft to the differential housing. When this takes place the drive torque can be distributed between the rear wheels.

The limited slip differential clutch is a disc type, and it is electro-hydraulically controlled by the XWD control module via a pressure control valve which is fitted on the limited slip differential clutch's housing.



Lubricant Notes:

Quote:
Originally Posted by SAAB

Lubricants


It is of the utmost importance that the correct lubricant is used in each respective component, only use recommended oils.

The oil in the transfer case is subject to significant stress in the hypoid gear, the oil used is of the best quality and gives low friction, which means that the temperature of the oil is maintained at the correct level.

The fluid used in the differential clutch is a unique product. As the fluid is used to cool and lubricate the clutch pack its friction properties are very important. The control module calculates the viscosity of the fluid in order to compensate for differential clutch application. This is based on the use of a fluid with known and specific properties.

The final drive gear places particular demands on the properties of the oil, partly due to the hypoid gear and partly due to the limited slip differential clutch (if fitted). The oil is equipped with an additive to regulate the friction in the limited slip differential clutch's disc pack.
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You still don't understand. This is like trying to explain calculus to a clam.

Last edited by DrewP; 01-12-2012 at 10:20 AM.
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Old 01-12-2012, 10:12 AM   #3
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Could this get copied and stickied in the 9-3SS section?
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Old 01-12-2012, 10:36 AM   #4
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Thanks Drew.. !
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Old 01-12-2012, 10:42 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrewP View Post
Could this get copied and stickied in the 9-3SS section?
Si señor.
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Old 01-12-2012, 11:07 AM   #6
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I believe I've read that the service interval is 35k miles.
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Old 01-12-2012, 03:08 PM   #7
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Wow, just had an 07 Aero come in with a leaking axle seal. I had ordered 6 liters for someone who did not come back in for a flush. I guess this guy lucked out.
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Old 02-02-2017, 01:51 AM   #8
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Good job, Drew. You helped me a lot.
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